What Music Would De Sade Have Listened To?

This may be one of the more unusual questions ever posted here.

I know this will be a kinky question to some of you, but I'm a Mistress in the modern mainstream community of BDSM ( *****, Discipline, Sadism, Masochism ).

These are people who stick to only legal and consensual forms of this, and refer to it as 'play'.

They have dungeons, usually in major cities, often even in their homes.

Often, various music is played, to give background settings for the activities, which may include floggings or whippings of willing submissives.

Since becoming interested in these forms of play, I've often stopped to wonder about what someone like the Marquis De Sade may have listened to back in his day, while he may have been flogging someone.

This is a fascinating and intriguing question to me, as I'd like to put together a collection of dungeon music for one of our local dungeons and it would be interesting to make one with the kind of music De Sade may have used for this in his day.

Does anyone have historical knowledge of this, or could anyone speculate?

I know I've been using some Bach organ fugues, but there must be more than that.

Corporal Mistress

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paulsonjack avatar
4 years ago #2
paulsonjack
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Marche Slave - Tchaikovsky Prisoners' Chorus - Beethoven The Knot Garden - Tippett Chain 2 - Lutoslawski Summer's last weal and testament - Lambert Harmonie der Welt - Hindemith Smack the knife - Weill Anything by Rackmaninov

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globular avatar
4 years ago #3
globular
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Pay no attention to this list: Not one of these (or the originals on which stupid puns are attempted) had been written in de Sade's lifetime.

He's also quite unlikely to have known any Bach organ fugues; the only organ pieces of Bach's that had been published were the '18 Great' chorale preludes.

In Paris in the 1780s he could have known (of music that's familiar today) symphonies of Haydn or Mozart, and operas of Gluck. In catalogs, look for music of the 'Rococo' style, but remember that there wasn't much opportunity to hear what was going on in other cultural centers, so be sure to choose things from Paris or that you can determine were played there! (Very little music was *published* in the 18th century.)

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Lilith avatar
4 years ago #4
Lilith
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:> > and it would be interesting to make one with the kind of music De Sade :> > may have used for this in his day.

: In Paris in the 1780s he could have known (of music that's familiar : today) symphonies of Haydn or Mozart, and operas of Gluck. In catalogs, : look for music of the 'Rococo' style, but remember that there wasn't : much opportunity to hear what was going on in other cultural centers, so : be sure to choose things from Paris or that you can determine were : played there! (Very little music was *published* in the 18th century.)

I wonder if there's any evidence that he did his thing to music at all. At that time, he would have had to have hired musicians to perform it live.

On the other hand, there's a very good chance that what he did was to tie people down, have the musicians play the Pachelbel Canon, and then leave the room. . .

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ipixer avatar
4 years ago #5
ipixer
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'No! No! Not the symphonies concertantes! AAAUGH!!!...OH! OH! OH!'

(From *The 100 Concerts Spirituels of Sodom*)

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Via Caltha avatar
4 years ago #6
Via Caltha
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(Why do I keep thinking of Lee van Cleef flogging to fiddle music in *The good, the bad & the ugly* here?)

Seriously, though, there _is_ a certain very charming irony in the notion of historically informed dungeon music that sounds indistinguishable from Classical Lite radio programming during rush hour.

If Melissa R want to avoid that connotation and still remain within the historical ballpark, she could try looking among the more severe infernal scenes in French opera of the period

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Tijbuktur avatar
4 years ago #7
Tijbuktur
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How about Mozart's 'Paris' symphony (no. 31), which was written specifically to the tastes of Paris audiences (and therefore(?) de Sade's?)...

With a little research, though, it would probably be easy to find actual programs of compositions performed on specific dates in the 1780s in Paris.

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Heath Patrie avatar
4 years ago #8
Heath Patrie
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Not the real direction. Need music very precise, and very open and well structured, but with a hint of innocence. Need Lully, not Couperin, I believe.

'Gothic' music is more in the mind then in the instrument... the Bach fugues, with their sweeping otherworldness, would have been vulgar to the Marquis. Need music so fine that it would make contact boring to your membership; would change your focus to concert going. Music which makes your body twirl, not twitch. A dilemma. =)

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LimShady avatar
4 years ago #9
LimShady
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I don't believe she is staging a puppet play. She wants soundtrack for a masque of the transformation of soul. She certainly doesn't want to be historical, because she is helping people invent their own bodies in their own moment. If it were just a theatre of Gothic Horror, I believe Mussorsky to be the cruelist composer. But, for the Theatre of Cruelty, you would want a music you could destroy for your players. Destroy its beauty. I suggest music from 'King and I'.

('getting to gnaw you, ...'

mike =)

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WayneM avatar
4 years ago #10
WayneM
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How wrong you are.

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swaqar avatar
4 years ago #11
swaqar
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(David) scratched into my forehead in

To elaborate on that, the Corelli variations or the First Concerto. Idil Biret's Etude-Tableau Op. 39/7 would be great for a quickie (11

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